This episode was all about the Fring, but first let’s catch up with the main character:

Job Interviews! Who doesn’t love them?

This is the episode where Jimmy decides to go find a legitimate job… right?

Disgraced lawyer turned interviewee, he immediately sets rapport with the manager of a company that sells copiers, one of the favorite subjects of his former persona “Charlie Hustle”, the one who worked on the HHM mail room making copies, chatting up repair crews, getting the business done. He even gets to meet the company president.

Making an intense comeback, for the joy of elderly ladies all over the world, the Hummel dolls are here in all their porcelain greatness, brought back to the show by Mr. Neff’s late mother’s collection, displayed on his office.

As impressive as his knowledge about copiers was,  he was still a former lawyer and not a salesman. So, they said they would get back at him, a probable “no” on its way.

Our protagonist walked away slowly until he realized the situation called for a display of passion. So he walks back to the office. And what a display that was.

Jimmy speaks out about life, about copiers and about selling truths to his clients, a harder thing to do than any, but that he got the job done any way. That he would work as hard as anyone could and he would start bringing businesses immediately.

They hired him on the spot. And he did not take the job.

“I could be a psychopath. I could be a guy who pees on your coffeepot. I could be both!”

Jimmy rips both of his interviewers apart, citing their gullibility as the reason they were suckers and leaves.

As a viewer, I just kept asking myself why, it didn’t make sense. Why go through all that trouble? Why go there, anyway?

Then I realized that from the moment he caught his eye on the Hummels, Jimmy was just casing the place for a heist.

Bob Odenkirk is so comfortable in this role that sometimes it seems like Jimmy is wearing his skin, as if the actor is the avatar of some strange mystical being obsessed with shenanigans and chicanery.  That the series has these moments of quiet stillness while we can sense the storm brewing beneath the surface of these characters is a testament to the quality of this amazingly talented production.

Hector Salamanca is in bad shape. He’s not yet the wheelchair-bound, bell-sounding menace he is in Breaking Bad, but pretty bad shape nonetheless.

While he is catatonic, unresponsive and confined to a bed, his nephews, the scary cartel twins Marco and Leonel, keep a steady watch over his bedside while visitors abound, including Gus’s personal physician, who gives Gus a diagnosis of the situation, reminding him that no one deserves a worse fate than Hector Salamanca.

“I’ll decide what he deserves”, says Gus, the control freak genius, the brains of the cartel, the man that’s so good at dealing drugs that he makes it look legitimate.

Gus goes out of his way to save the elderly gangster and brings in Dr. Bruckner, a specialist from Johns Hopkins to assist in his recovery of the neural pathways and take the case out of the hands of a very nervous resident doctor that is just glad to get out of the room with the menacing men.

In comes a funny scene, as Nacho and Arturo are urged to speak to the barely cognizant Hector and just blurt out some random snippets of conversation about their gang.

Lydia is neurotic about Mike’s previous visit to the Madrigal warehouse and urges him not to do it anymore. Ehrmantraut tries to make her understand that his search for security flaws is actually a good thing for their process, but to no avail, they remain on a stand off and she gives him a veiled threat.

She calls up Gus Fring to voice her complaints and gets told to give him a badge and move out of his way. I’m sure the shrewd businesswoman will not give up on trying to rein Mike’s efforts.

Nacho visits his family’s workshop, telling his father Hector is out of the picture, while him, in silent mode, simply puts dollar bills on a table, saying nothing to his son. Nacho picks the money up, reluctantly, making his way out of the workshop when he is interrupted by his father, asking him when would he get out of this life.

It’s too late for Nacho, who is dipped into the clutches of Gus, while he stares at an asphyxiated Arturo, the handywork of Fring’s handyman Victor, who is also destined to being dipped in the vat of acid episode of Breaking Bad.

While Jimmy is gallivanting around town with his crazy interview antics, Kim decides to go represent him in a meeting about Chuck McGill’s estate, featuring Chuck’s ex-wife Rebecca and the usually unpleasant Howard Hamlin, everyone’s favorite douche.

Howard The Douche offers Jimmy five thousand dollars and a place in a scholarship board for “deserving students”, something that Chuck would never give his own  undeserving  brother, the chance to gather personal belongings scavenging the place where his brother died screaming and a last “fuck you” letter from good old Chuck himself. If you zoom in on that scene you can actually see the fire burning in Kim’s eyes.

Right after Rebecca leaves, Kim brutally lays down the law on Howard, about the absurdness of his recent actions and how he should just stop doing whatever he was doing and leave them alone, as the rest of the McGill family is exhausted of Hamlin’s unrelenting pursuit of Chuck’s posthumous jabs at Jimmy.

That verbal smack down was a long time coming.

Now what’s gonna happen with this posthumous letter?

Kim has decided to keep it from Jimmy, for the time being, but I have a feeling that it will definitely be pivotal to this season’s wrapping. Maybe it will be what sends Jimmy off the edge, what defines his complete shedding of the McGill identity and is the source of his impending(It has to be, right? Or else she would have appeared in BB) fallout with Kim.

All in all, another excellent episode.

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